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Tectia

Creating Connection Profiles

On Tectia Client on Windows and , you can configure separate connection settings for each Secure Shell server you connect to. You can also create several profiles for the same server, for example, with different user accounts.

On Windows, you can add connection profiles via the following views:

  • Start Tectia SSH Terminal GUI and click the Profiles button. Select Add profile from the drop-down menu, as shown in the following figure.

    Adding connection profiles in Tectia Connections Configuration GUI

    Figure 3.4. Adding connection profiles in Tectia Connections Configuration GUI

  • Start Tectia SSH Terminal GUI and open the Tectia Connections Configuration GUI by clicking the Tectia icon on the toolbar.

    Or you can open the Tectia Connections Configuration GUI by right-clicking the Tectia tray icon in the system task bar and selecting Configuration from the shortcut menu.

On Linux, open the Tectia Connections Configuration GUI:

  1. Go to /opt/tectia/bin directory. Enter:

    $ cd /opt/tectia/bin/
  2. Start the Tectia Connections Configuration GUI. Enter:

    $ ssh-tectia-configuration

In the Tectia Connections Configuration GUI, go to the Connection Profiles page (as shown below) and click Add profile.

Adding connection profiles

Figure 3.5. Adding connection profiles

Newly created connection profiles will inherit the default values for authentication, ciphers, MACs, KEXs, tunneling, and advanced server settings defined under the General → Default Connection page. The values can be customized on the profile-specific tabbed pages, see Figure 3.6.

To rename a connection profile, select a profile and click Rename. Type a new name and click OK.

To remove a connection profile, select a profile and click Delete. You will be asked for confirmation. Click OK to proceed with the deletion.


 

 
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