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SSH Tectia 
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    About This Document>>
    Installing SSH Tectia Client >>
    Getting Started >>
    Configuring SSH Tectia Client >>
        Defining Profile Settings >>
            Defining Connection Settings
            Selecting Ciphers
            Selecting Authentication Methods
            Selecting Colors
            Defining Keyboard Settings
            Using Keymap Editor
            Tunneling Applications
            Defining File Transfer Settings
            Defining Favorites
        Defining Global Settings >>
        Editing the Configuration Files >>
        Using Command-Line Options
        Customizing the User Interface>>
    Connecting to a Remote Host Computer>>
    Transferring Files>>
    Tunneling Applications>>
    GUI Reference>>
    Troubleshooting >>
    Command-Line Tools >>

Tunneling Applications

Tunneling, or port forwarding, is a way of forwarding otherwise unsecured TCP traffic through an encrypted Secure Shell tunnel. You can secure for example POP3, SMTP, and HTTP connections that would otherwise be unsecured.

Note: The client-server applications using the tunnel will carry out their own authentication procedures (if any) the same way they would without the encrypted tunnel.

For a more thorough explanation of tunneling, see SSH Tectia Client/Server Product Description. For practical tunneling examples, see Sections How to Set Up Tunneling for E-Mail and How to Set Up Tunneling for FTP.

Tunneling settings are configured using the Tunneling page of the Settings dialog. Any changed tunneling settings will take effect the next time you log in.


client-tunneling-page-27.gif
Figure : The Tunneling page of the Settings dialog

The outgoing and incoming tunnel settings are configured using the Outgoing and Incoming tabs of the Tunneling page.

Outgoing

Outgoing tunnels protect TCP connections that your local computer forwards from a specified local port to the specified port on the remote host computer you are connected to.


client-tunneling-imap-28.gif
Figure : Tunneling an IMAP connection for secure e-mail

It is also possible to forward the connection beyond the remote host computer. However, the connection is encrypted only between the client (local computer) and the Secure Shell server. See Figure Forwarding to a third host.


client-forwardingtoathirdhost-29.gif
Figure : Forwarding to a third host

Click the Outgoing tab to edit outgoing tunnel definitions.

The following fields are used to define an outgoing tunnel. These values can be edited by clicking Add or Edit on the Outgoing page of the Settings dialog.

  • Name

    The name of the tunnel definition. You can use this field to type in a descriptive name that will help you to recognize this tunnel definition later on.

  • Listen Port

    This is the number of the local port that the tunnel listens to, or captures.

    Note: The protocol or application that you wish to create the tunnel for may have a fixed port number (for example 143 for IMAP) that it needs to use to connect successfully. Other protocols or applications may require an offset (for example 5900 for VNC) that you will have to take into an account.

  • Destination Host

    This field defines the destination host for the port forwarding. The default value is localhost.

    Note: The value of localhost is resolved after the Secure Shell connection has been established, so here localhost refers to the remote host computer you have connected to.

  • Destination Port

    The destination port defines the port that is used for the forwarded connection on the destination host.

  • Allow Local Connections Only

    Leave a check mark in this box if you want to allow only local connections to be made. This means that other computers will not be able to use the tunnel created by you. By default, only local connections are allowed. This is the right choice for most situations. You should carefully consider the security implications if you decide to also allow outside connections.

  • Type

    Select the type of the tunnel from the drop-down list. Valid choices are TCP and FTP.

Incoming

Incoming tunnels protect TCP connections that the remote host forwards from a specified remote port to the specified port on your local computer. Click the Incoming tab to edit incoming tunnel definitions.


client-tunneling-http-30.gif
Figure : Redirecting the HTTP connection to a remote host port 8080 to your local computer port 80

The following fields are used to define an incoming tunnel. These values can be edited by clicking Add or Edit.

  • Name

    The name of the tunnel definition. You can use this field to type in a descriptive name that will help you to recognize this tunnel definition later on.

  • Listen Port

    The port that the tunnel listens to, or captures from the remote host computer.

    Note: Privileged ports (below 1024) can be forwarded only when logging in with root privileges on the remote host computer.

  • Destination Host

    This field defines the destination host for the port forwarding. The default value is localhost.

    Note: Here localhost refers to your local computer. Also note that if the connection from the remote host computer is forwarded beyond your local computer, that connection is unsecured.

  • Destination Port

    The destination port defines the port that is used for the forwarded connection on the destination host.

  • Type

    Select the type of the tunnel from the drop-down list. Valid choices are TCP and FTP.

Configuring Tunnels

The following buttons are available for configuring outgoing and incoming tunnels.

  • Add

    Click Add to add a tunnel definition. An Add New Tunnel dialog opens, allowing you to define the name, type, listen port, destination host, and destination port for the port forwarding. With outgoing tunnels you can also define whether you allow local connections only.

    Note: If you are tunneling an FTP connection, you must set the tunnel type as FTP.

    If the Secure Shell server and the FTP server are located on separate host computers, FTP tunneling works only if FTP is set to run in passive mode. If the Secure Shell server and the FTP server are located on the same computer, tunneling works regardless of whether FTP is running in passive or active mode.

  • Edit

    Select a tunnel definition from the list and click Edit to edit a tunnel. An Edit Tunnel dialog opens, allowing you to edit the name, listen port, destination host, and destination port of the outgoing tunnel. With outgoing tunnels you can also define whether you allow local connections only.

  • Remove

    Select a tunnel definition from the list and click Remove to remove a tunnel. Note that the selected tunnel will be removed immediately, with no confirmation dialog.

X11 Tunneling

SSH Tectia Client can securely tunnel (forward) X11 graphic connections from the remote host computer to an X Windows server running on the local computer.

Note: You must also be running an X emulator such as eXceed or Reflection X in passive mode on the Windows computer for X11 tunneling to work.

To tunnel (forward) X11 traffic, do the following:

  1. Install an X server (X emulation) program on Windows (eXceed, Reflection X, or the like).
  2. Start SSH Tectia Client.
  3. Select the Edit -> Settings... -> Tunneling option and make sure that the Tunnel X11 connections check box is selected.
  4. Save your settings for SSH Tectia Client.
  5. Quit the client, start it again and log into the remote host.
  6. Start the X server (X emulation) program.
  7. To test the tunneling, run xterm or xclock from SSH Tectia Client.

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