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SSH Tectia

Installing on Linux

SSH Tectia Server for Linux platforms is supplied in RPM (Red Hat Package Manager) binary packages. The RPMs are available for Red Hat and SUSE Linux running on Intel x86 (i386) platforms. The package for the x86 architecture is compatible also with the 64-bit versions of Red Hat and SUSE Linux running on x86-64 platforms.

On the installation CD-ROM, the installation packages for Linux are located in the /install/linux/ directory. Two packages are required: one for the common components of SSH Tectia Client and Server, and another for the specific components of SSH Tectia Server.

To install SSH Tectia Server on Linux, follow the instructions below:

  1. (Not necessary in "third-digit" maintenance updates.) Copy the license file to the /etc/ssh2/licenses directory. See Licensing.

    If this is the initial installation of SSH Tectia Server 5.x, the directory does not yet exist. You can either create it manually or copy the license after the installation. In the latter case, you have to start the server manually after copying the license file.

  2. Install the packages with root privileges:

    # rpm -Uvh ssh-tectia-common-<ver>.<arch>.rpm
    # rpm -Uvh ssh-tectia-server-<ver>.<arch>.rpm
    

    In the commands, <ver> is the current package version of SSH Tectia Server (for example, 5.2.0.120) and <arch> is the platform architecture (i386).

    The server host key is generated during the installation. Key generation may take several minutes on slow machines.

  3. The installation should (re)start the server automatically.

    If the server does not start (because of a missing license, for example), you can start it after correcting the problem by issuing the command:

    # /etc/init.d/ssh-server-g3 start
    


 

 
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