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Tectia

Processing and Distributing Data

With Tectia MFT Events, it is possible to poll files and directories for changes at regular intervals, and when any modifications are detected in the polled source, an event gets run.

In this example, there are two separate events configured on the Operations Server. Between the events, an operator processes the files manually.

Processing and distributing data with Tectia MFT Events

Figure 4.8. Processing and distributing data with Tectia MFT Events

Event A: Tectia MFT Events on the Operations Server polls a directory on the Backend Server every 10 minutes. If the directory has any new or changed files, Tectia MFT Events:

  1. pulls the files from the Backend Server and transfers them to the Target Host

  2. sends a notification email to the Operator that new files are available.

Configuration of Event A in Tectia MFT Events administration interface

Figure 4.9. Configuration of Event A in Tectia MFT Events administration interface

After receiving the notification, the operator processes the files as needed, adds the code ready to the file names, and stores the files to the outgoing drop-in folder.

Event B: Tectia MFT Events on the Operations Server polls the drop-in folder on the Target Host every 15 minutes. If there are new or changed files, it:

  1. Pulls the new or changed files from the Operations Server when they have <ready> included in the file name; this is configured with the Include pattern. The Grace period option is used to allow 2 seconds for the file modifications to end before the event is triggered.

  2. Transfers the files to the remote servers, (Regional Office Servers and Partner Servers).

The file modification-based trigger for Event B is configured as follows:

Configuration of the file modification-based trigger for Event B

Figure 4.10. Configuration of the file modification-based trigger for Event B

See the logs in the Log view to verify that the event was executed as planned.


 

 
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