Privileged Identity Management Articles

Showing Articles: 19 of 9

Aug 1 2014

With “Backoff” POS Malware, Attackers Use Your Security Tools Against You

Yesterday the US Department of Homeland Security issued a warning to US businesses against a new POS malware attack called “Backoff”. The attackers are targeting common remote access systems like Microsoft Remote Desktop, Apple Remote Desktop, Chrome Remote Desktop, Splashtop, Pulseway and join.me. To make matters worse, this little bug is difficult for anti-virus software to…

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Jul 23 2014

Snowden Calls On Employees To Leak Company Secrets

During the Hackers On Planet Earth (HOPE) conference, Edward Snowden and Daniel Ellsberg called on insiders (employees) to spill corporate and government secrets.  Snowden is calling for the development of encryption and obfuscation tools to make this easier. The goal is to anonymously expose malfeasance without any repercussions. They believe that people should be able to do this without paying any price and without being held accountable. Superficially this all sounds like a good idea, but who gets to decide what should be leaked or stolen and what constitutes improper behavior?  What else could be leaked or…

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May 28 2014

Identity & Access Management: Don’t get Death Starred!

Many things seem impenetrable until a “small vulnerability” is exploited. The phrase “small vulnerability” almost sounds like an oxymoron when you think about it.  Take the fable of one Luke Skywalker and the Death Star.  In the story Luke exploited a small two-meter-wide thermal exhaust port in the Death Star’s design to destroy the ultimate weapon and break the back of the Galactic Empire in their moment of triumph. To make matters worse the Empire was warned about this “small vulnerability”, but the Galactic bureaucrats reasoned that the risk was small and the whistleblowers were overestimating rebels’ chances…

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May 19 2014

Just A Heartbleed Away: The Dirty Little Secret in IT Security is Creating A Major Risk

One of the major lessons learned from the Heartbleed Bug is just how vulnerable critical IT components, like encryption, are. The potential impact of these vulnerabilities can be severe and far-reaching. To make matters worse, a lack of management controls and visibility, especially in ubiquitously deployed software, enables cyber criminals…

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Apr 27 2014

Privileged Users – Not Malicious But Still a Threat

One of challenges security architects face is finding the right balance between security and end user convenience. This conflict is typified by the example of password policies. A too stringent policy drives users to write down their passwords on sticky notes (thus defeating the security objective) and a too weak policy leaves passwords exposed to cracking…

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Apr 4 2014

Five Reasons Why You Should Monitor & Control [All of] Your Secure Shell Traffic

How many times have we heard “the perimeter isn’t secure”? In fact, with BYOD, cloud and the extended enterprise, it’s hard to define what the perimeter is anymore.  The concept of a porous perimeter that can’t be trusted is the foundation of the Zero Trust model of security and many organizations are adopting this approach. Here are five reasons why monitoring and controlling Secure Shell should be included in your organization's Zero Trust…

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Mar 4 2014

RSA Conference 2014 Wrap Up

This year’s RSA Conference 2014 was filled with energy and great insights as well as controversy. Here are a few of the trends and topics that I saw at this year’s show.

Energy: Encryption and access controls are up there at the top of the list
There was a huge uptick in the overall energy at the show. Our booth was inundated with people asking questions and wanting to learn more about our…

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Feb 11 2014

APT The Mask (aka Careto) Targets Secure Shell Keys

Kaspersky Labs recently revealed the details of a sophisticated APT named “The Mask” or by its Spanish name “Careto”. The Mask is known to have infected at least 380 unique victims in over 31 countries. In operation since 2007, the primary targets of this APT are government institutions, diplomatic offices, energy companies, research institutions, private equity firms and political activist organizations. The sophistication and targets of the APT suggest it is the work of nation-state actors as opposed to criminal…

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